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Peace and Justice

Ignatian Spirituality - 17 hours 50 min ago

In these troubled days, here are a few resources to assist prayer and reflection on themes of peace and justice. Justice in the Spiritual Exercises Contemplation on the Incarnation (Part of An Ignatian Prayer Adventure) Praying Through the Storms of Life Peace Prayer of Saint Francis 3-Minute Retreat: Seek Peace 3-Minute Retreat: Seeking Justice 3-Minute […]

IgnatianSpirituality.com ® is a service of Loyola Press, a Jesuit ministry.

Experience the goodness of God with your five senses with help from Taste and See by Ginny Kubitz Moyer.

Click through to read the full article Peace and Justice, which appeared first on Ignatian Spirituality.

Categories: Things Jesuit

#Blackouttuesday: It Wasn’t About a Trend, It Was About Real Life

Latest from the Jesuit Post - 20 hours 46 min ago

What did you learn yesterday? Anything? My interpretation of #BlackOutTuesday: mute the self-centeredness of social media and heed the words of Psalm 34:15: “The eyes of the Lord are toward the righteous, and his ears toward their cry.” It was a call to learn something, and maybe even do something. 

Here is what I learned:

I learned from Embracing Equality that as a non-black person of color, “I have the privilege to fight racism with less risk than a black person because of the pathological anti-blackness that undergirds systemic racism in the U.S. and the ways in which black people are more severely retaliated against than non-black people of color.” Though I am brown, though I have experienced levels of racism against my own brown body, I am not black. My brown skin may have scars and bruises, but it does not carry the unhealed and recurring wounds of black skin.  

I learned the differences between being an ally, an accomplice, and a co-conspirator in the fight against racism. Google or YouTube those terms and discover them more fully with me.  

Here is what I did:

I had conversations about race with my father, two colleagues, three friends, and the lady across from me at Krogers as we waited in cars for our groceries. The conversations were uncomfortable at times. Confusing. Frustrating. Hopeful. Affirming. And in having them, I discovered resilience. I uncovered hope. I realized I have a long way to go in my own self-education about racism, and I found I was okay with that. I felt encouraged to learn more. 

I prayed too. Lord, I prayed! And you know what? The discoveries I made, the little bit of self-education I did, and the conversations I had informed my prayer. I had better language to pray with, my heart felt different, and I believe the Lord reads our hearts. Prayer was alive because I knew what I wanted to pray about! Not just prayers to end racism. Prayers for courage to engage myself in my own weaknesses and fears. Prayers for the stamina to endure the long work of dismantling racism in me so I can better confront it in the world. 

Learn these things with me. Have these conversations. And, pray with me. Here’s a way how:  

  • Take a moment to silence yourself. To be still. Breathe in. Breathe out. Become aware of God’s presence in this moment. Focus on God’s love around you.
  • Ponder three moments you were grateful for in your day yesterday. Allow those moments to be a reminder of God’s love for you.
  • Ask God for the ability to reflect honestly about yourself in the context of race and racism. Sift through the happenings and emotions as you have watched or read the news surrounding the death of George Floyd, the recent protests, and the history of racism you are aware of.
  • Choose three features (event, feeling, etc.) of your day yesterday and pray from it. In light of #BlackOutTuesday, what did you see, hear, or read from others? What did you feel? Did you learn anything about yourself in the context of race or racism? If none of these happened for you, that’s okay, and don’t let it go. Sit in prayer with what you are feeling right now, acknowledge it, offer it up to God and ask for what you need to freely step inside the work of anti-racism.
  • Embrace today, tomorrow, the week by looking ahead. Identify something in the context of race or racism that you want to learn more about. Take a moment to pinpoint something you feel uneasy about in the context of race or racism and invite God into that fear. What do you need to aid you in this work of anti-racism and ask God for that grace.
  • Conclude with your favorite prayer or the Our Father. 

-//-

Photo by Josh Hild on Unsplash

Categories: Things Jesuit

The Closeness of God

Ignatian Spirituality - Mon, 06/01/2020 - 05:30

My immobility after the fall and during recovery showed me clearly how close God was to me. Previously, I was often so active that I didn’t realize this closeness. God waited until I was ready to listen to reveal his patient and gentle presence. I realized how everything I had taken for granted had actually […]

IgnatianSpirituality.com ® is a service of Loyola Press, a Jesuit ministry.

Experience the goodness of God with your five senses with help from Taste and See by Ginny Kubitz Moyer.

Click through to read the full article The Closeness of God, which appeared first on Ignatian Spirituality.

Categories: Things Jesuit

His Name was George Floyd

Latest from the Jesuit Post - Mon, 06/01/2020 - 01:30

“The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing.”—Edmund Burke

It has happened again. Another unarmed black man killed by a group of mostly white police officers. And yet again, this man’s death was recorded. The bystanders recording were voicing their concerns the man wasn’t breathing. The video is readily available. Be warned, it is disturbing.

And we should be disturbed.

It’s a cliche to say that social media has completely changed the world. That’s obvious. But a particular way that it’s changed the world is the knowledge it makes available to the masses of people all over the world. Someone in small town Texas can know what’s happening in China in a matter of seconds. Live streaming actually plugs us in real-time into what’s happening across a vast amount of space. 

We are able to celebrate a grandparent’s birthday from across the country and witness rocket launches. But we also are made aware of the unjust use of force and power in police brutality. This experience reminds me of a part of the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius, the retreat which Jesuits make at least twice in their formation.

Before praying over the birth of Jesus, the retreatant is asked to consider the world from the perspective of the Trinity, to imagine all the events and people in the world. All the joys, and all the sufferings. People celebrating and people mourning. Some living, others dying. Those saving lives, and those who are murdering their brothers and sisters. And God chooses to become incarnate in Christ in order to redeem and save all of humanity.

We are living in a moment of history in which we possess something similar to that Trinitarian view of the world. The internet allows us to see what’s happening across the world almost instantaneously. We see the joys and celebrations. But those should not distract us from also seeing the atrocities and destruction of life. The Trinity did not avert its gaze from our suffering. Even more, God chose to become involved in it. God made our suffering His own. And now that same choice is ours. We have been convicted by the power of the internet. No longer can we claim ignorance of the unjust suffering and brutal deaths of black people in this country. 

His name was George Floyd.

He was detained by four police officers for allegedly using counterfeit money, but that ultimately is of no importance. There are a few basic facts by which to judge what has been captured on camera. George was handcuffed. Three officers were pressing down on his body. One of those offices was kneeling and putting the full weight of his body on the Mr. Floyd’s neck. And George can be heard pleading for his life with words that are a rallying cry, “I can’t breathe.” 

Eric Garner pleaded with those same words when he was killed by police on July 17, 2014 in New York City. We know there are countless other unarmed black men killed every year. Our discernment, following the example of our Trinitarian God and in light of the view that we have of so much suffering, is to determine how to respond. How do we enter into the suffering and make it our own?

We can march for justice. On March 26 and every day since, thousands of people gathered in Minneapolis and almost every major city in the US to protest police brutality against black people. In most cities, peaceful protests have descended into rioting, but that should not distract us from why people are protesting. A black man was murdered by white police officers. And it isn’t the first time. The challenge for the American public is how to use the righteous anger so many are feeling without letting that anger become uncontrolled rage. We know Jesus turned over tables, but we need to examine his way of proceeding in all its fullness, for it’s the way of love. 

Even as Jesus turned over tables in the Temple, he did not hurt one single person or animal being sold. He used power, but he also expressed gentleness. Destruction of property is not the destruction of life. We must not cite broken windows as equal to the broken body of George Floyd. 

I don’t mean to justify any use of force on the part of protesters, but I do not mourn broken windows or damaged property. I lament that there are people’s livelihoods being damaged, but even some of those owners are more concerned with the police brutality that sparked these protests in the first place. The reality is the people’s desire for justice is boiling over. We need a path forward, and we need God’s Spirit of justice to guide us.

We can once again turn to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. for an example of how to move forward, committed to nonviolence while also navigating the inherent conflict that arises from such a commitment. As a white man who cares about racial justice in the world, I feel especially convicted by King’s words in his “Letter from a Birmingham Jail.”

Again, all it takes for evil to prevail is for good people to do nothing. King addresses those people in his letter. 

King writes, “I have almost reached the regrettable conclusion that the Negro’s great stumbling block in his stride toward freedom is not the White Citizen’s Councilor or the Ku Klux Klanner, but the white moderate, who is more devoted to “order” than to justice; who prefers a negative peace which is the absence of tension to a positive peace which is the presence of justice; who constantly says: “I agree with you in the goal you seek, but I cannot agree with your methods of direct action.”

We need sustained acts of civil disobedience by people of all races and creeds until the structures that allow law enforcement officers to treat people so callously are changed. Read Dr. King’s letter right now. Pray over it. It is a masterclass on nonviolent civil disobedience, and it articulates better than I ever could why this sort of disobedience is the path of love. And that’s the most important thing to remember.

Love must lead the way. And as the meditation on the Incarnation, mentioned above, teaches us, love is not passive. Love compels us to make the suffering of the people around us our own.There are many ways you can get involved. Consider joining The Action PAC, a grassroots movement that works to mobilize people to seek justice. Or stay informed on social justice issues, including racial justice, by visiting Ignatian Solidarity Network or the Jesuit Social Research Institute. Or even take the time to watch the video below for some wise words and guidance by Christian rapper Lecrae. Together we can build a more just world for all people, especially our black brothers and sisters. Peace be with you all.

Categories: Things Jesuit

Pentecost: The Holy Spirit Unites Us | One-Minute Homily

Latest from the Jesuit Post - Sun, 05/31/2020 - 01:00

The Holy Spirit is everywhere and allows us to be united and share in the work of God. Jeff Ryan Miraflor, SJ, reflects on the Feast of Pentecost in this week’s One-Minute Homily.

Come, Holy Spirit!

Hi, I’m Jeff Ryan Miraflor and this is my One-Minute Reflection.

The Holy Spirit is definitely the most underrated person of the Trinity. The Spirit is the one who unites us all! Jesus in His human body couldn’t be everywhere to reach all peoples. The Holy Spirit meanwhile can be everywhere and in everyone at all times.

Although God could spread the good news himself, He chooses to have humanity participate in the Salvation of the world. God wants us to be his hands and feet on earth, most especially his mouth. That’s what we see in today’s passage from Acts, the Holy Spirit descending as tongues of fire and giving the disciples the ability to understand each different language in the room. This way, they are able to go out to the whole world and proclaim to people of different languages that Christ is Lord.

We’re no different. All of us who are baptized and confirmed in the faith have the gifts of the Holy Spirit to go out and be God’s mouth, hands, and feet to proclaim Him to the world.

Categories: Things Jesuit

Waiting for the Spirit Online Retreat Day Nine

Ignatian Spirituality - Sat, 05/30/2020 - 03:00

Welcome to the conclusion of Waiting for the Spirit! Thank you for journeying with us through these nine days of online retreat. Feel free to post your final reflections in the comments area below today’s content as we encourage one another in prayer. The Grace I Seek I pray for the grace to recognize the […]

IgnatianSpirituality.com ® is a service of Loyola Press, a Jesuit ministry.

Experience the goodness of God with your five senses with help from Taste and See by Ginny Kubitz Moyer.

Click through to read the full article Waiting for the Spirit Online Retreat Day Nine, which appeared first on Ignatian Spirituality.

Categories: Things Jesuit

Waiting for the Spirit Online Retreat Day Eight

Ignatian Spirituality - Fri, 05/29/2020 - 03:00

Welcome back to Waiting for the Spirit! As we draw near the end of our online retreat, feel free to post your reflections in the comments area below each day’s content as we encourage one another in prayer. Go back and read other retreatants’ comments too as we walk together with the Lord. The Grace […]

IgnatianSpirituality.com ® is a service of Loyola Press, a Jesuit ministry.

Experience the goodness of God with your five senses with help from Taste and See by Ginny Kubitz Moyer.

Click through to read the full article Waiting for the Spirit Online Retreat Day Eight, which appeared first on Ignatian Spirituality.

Categories: Things Jesuit

After George Floyd’s Suffocation: A Litany for Oxygen From a Black Jesuit

Latest from the Jesuit Post - Fri, 05/29/2020 - 00:00

We are asking for breath

“I can’t breathe!” cried Eric Garner before dying on July 10, 2014 at the hands of the police in Staten Island, New York. “I can’t breathe!” cried Freddy Gray before dying at the hands of the police in April, 2015 in Baltimore, Maryland. “I can’t breathe,” cried George Floyd before dying this Monday, May 25 in Minneapolis, Minnesota at the hands of the police. 

We are crying for breath. 

In today’s America, one is never Black enough to be seen or heard. This is true even when desperately begging for life, for breath. Despite the stereotype that “Black people are too loud,”  when it comes time to cry for our lives, it seems we cannot be loud enough to be heard by police. 

Today, while many are protecting themselves against COVID-19, a respiratory illness, Black people are reminded that we need to worry about both COVID-19 and the police restricting, or stopping, our ability to breathe. 

George Floyd, a 46-year-old man, gave his last breaths under the knee of a white police officer to whom his cries were inaudible. One can make assumptions about the intentions (subconscious or not) of a white police officer excruciatingly choking a Black man whose nose is bleeding into the street until he is unconscious. The seeming lack of equality in how compassion and human decency are meted out to black people in various altercations with the police does not cease to be a national disgrace.   

Despite the videos circulating on social media, the initial police report of the incident failed to mention that the officer’s knee was on Floyd’s neck and that he was jammed to the ground for over eight minutes. 

Nevertheless, all of America is free to see the truth of what happened

Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey said, “Every bit of what I saw was wrong.” Emotionally, he continued, “It was malicious. And it was unacceptable. There is no gray there.” 

As a Black man living in America, the video of George Floyd’s suffocation cues unhealed experiences with police in this country and makes me less optimistic that change between the Black community and the police will soon change. Though the officers were fired and a new FBI case opened, this killing still triggers the trauma that so many of us have experienced.

Being Black in America should not mean we walk in fear of death. But it does. It should not mean we have less access to breath. But it does.

The job of the police is to protect and serve. During George Floyd’s agony, however, we see officers stand by without assisting the dying man. “They were supposed to be there to serve, and to protect, and I didn’t see a single one of them lift a finger to do anything to help while he was begging for his life,” Floyd’s sister, Tara Brown, said. Unfortunately, surviving the police has become the daily prayer for many Black men in America. 

Research has shown that Black people are more likely to be stopped by police. I have been stopped arbitrarily by the police and now get nervous each time I see them, wondering if it will be my cause of death. Until we can have an open and honest national dialogue about racism and racial bias, this legitimate fear will continue. Until white people, especially those charged with carrying weapons to protect and serve are adequately converted from the power or denial of their own racial bias, Black people will be panting for breath.  

Floyd’s sister, Philonise Floyd, said, “They treated him worse than they treat animals.” This is the reality of the Black community’s experience with policing in the U.S. 

Discussing the police who ignored eleven cries for breath from Eric Garner, the philosopher George Yancy writes, “What were the distorted assumptions, affective rigidities, and moral opacities that occluded the movement necessary for those white police officers to see/hear that Garner was in distress, struggling to breathe, to aspire?”

We could ask the same about the suffocation of George Floyd. 

Dr. Yancy quotes Toni Morrison who locates the problem, a white problem, “somewhere between retina and object, between object and view.”

Perhaps police academies need to hire experts who can better train the ears and eyes of police officers so that they can actually hear when Black people desperately cry, “I can’t breathe.” Perhaps all white people need to find a way to better train their ears and eyes to adequately see and hear black people. 

Blacks are constantly begging for oxygen, a gift that God granted everyone. Centuries of systemic racism, such as redlining and gerrymandering, have rendered a long litany of resources unavailable to the Black community. 

Air should not be added to the list. 

It is hard for Black people to have to ask for their humanity to be recognized while also asking for breath. But here we are:   

Crying out for an America where we can trust the police.

Crying out for an America where our right to life matters.  

Crying out for an America where we can be seen and heard. 

Crying out for an America where we can enjoy the same privileges of breath. 

Crying out for oxygen that is not polluted by the contagions of racism.

Categories: Things Jesuit

Waiting for the Spirit Online Retreat Day Seven

Ignatian Spirituality - Thu, 05/28/2020 - 03:00

Welcome to Day Seven of Waiting for the Spirit! This online retreat leads us from Ascension to Pentecost. Feel free to post your reflections in the comments area below each day’s content as we encourage one another in prayer. The Grace I Seek I pray for the grace to recognize the Holy Spirit’s presence in […]

IgnatianSpirituality.com ® is a service of Loyola Press, a Jesuit ministry.

Experience the goodness of God with your five senses with help from Taste and See by Ginny Kubitz Moyer.

Click through to read the full article Waiting for the Spirit Online Retreat Day Seven, which appeared first on Ignatian Spirituality.

Categories: Things Jesuit

Waiting for the Spirit Online Retreat Day Six

Ignatian Spirituality - Wed, 05/27/2020 - 03:00

Welcome again to Waiting for the Spirit! Thank you for your presence and participation in this online retreat. Feel free to post your reflections in the comments area below each day’s content as we encourage one another in prayer. The Grace I Seek I pray for the grace to recognize the Holy Spirit’s presence in […]

IgnatianSpirituality.com ® is a service of Loyola Press, a Jesuit ministry.

In Always Discerning, Joseph A. Tetlow, SJ, shares how we can implement discernment into not only life’s big decisions but also into the everyday, more mundane choices we constantly have to make.

Click through to read the full article Waiting for the Spirit Online Retreat Day Six, which appeared first on Ignatian Spirituality.

Categories: Things Jesuit

Creating Together: Jesuits Invite You to an Interactive Art Retreat

Latest from the Jesuit Post - Wed, 05/27/2020 - 02:33

CLICK HERE to participate in Drawn into Friendship: An Interactive Art Retreat.

***

In 2015, I was living in Cleveland working in campus ministry at St. Ignatius High School when they asked me to put together a day-long retreat for faculty and staff. After some thought, I decided to team up with the school’s art teacher. We invited retreatants to a rented room in a local coffee shop to “Paint and Sip” – not wine – but lattés and cold brew as we led them through a series of drawing and meditative exercises centered on the Creation Story found in Genesis. As it turns out, I was out of town the day of the retreat, but I returned to hear it was a hit.

When the lockdowns started earlier this year, I, like others, soon started to miss family, friends, my faith community, and the people I have the privilege of ministering to here in Chicago. The pandemic had, of course, put an end to all in-person events. Several weeks into the shelter-in-place, dispirited and squirrely, I came across a quote from Pope Francis concerning our present situation: 

What we are living now is a place of ‘metanoia’ (conversion), and we have the chance to begin…So let’s not let it slip from us, and let’s move ahead….I’m living this as a time of great uncertainty. It’s a time for inventing, for creativity.

Inspired by Francis’ call to conversion, community-building, and creativity, I thought why not take that 2015 retreat and make it virtual for those who might also be feeling just as cooped up and restless as me. So, that’s what I and several other Jesuits with whom I live have done. 

Naively, I thought we could cobble something together in a couple of days. The hope was to have it published in those first weeks of Easter, for people to pray with throughout the season. Forward a month-and-a-half later and only now have we completed the finishing touches.

 At a recent mass, the presider stated: “Salvation is not efficient.” Coordinating this virtual retreat has made me realize that creation, too, is not efficient. What I thought was going to work the first, second, and third time around was not the case. When something wasn’t quite right, we had to edit, clip, rearrange, adapt, and, well, get creative. Even now, after viewing the final cut, there are still things I would like to change. But there comes a point when you simply have to let go of the idea of perfection. 

Working on the retreat reminded me that the creative process is messy. It can be frustrating. It requires patience and a generous and forgiving spirit. That there is grace in the process as much as “the product.” The same is true for life in general. Whether we’re crafting an art retreat, nurturing a marriage, raising children, cultivating gardens, or struggling to hand over the project of our lives to the God who got the ball rolling in the first place. All of it takes commitment, hope, and willingness to try, try, and try again.

In the end, I think it’s fitting that the production of this retreat has taken so long to bring everything together, and that its release will more-or-less coincide with the Feast of Pentecost. Because, Pentecost is an invitation to see that creation never was “finished,”  nor was it a one-time event that happened once-and-for-all “in the beginning.”

At Pentecost, God took a group of disoriented and traumatized men and women and breathed on them the same breath that was present at the formation of the world. Pentecost is an act of re-creation and a proclamation that God is more than willing to mold and remold, to roll up her sleeves and work with what she’s got, to dirty her fingers with the fallen stardust that we are. Patience, persistence, and a generous dose of kindly playfulness is essential. 

This week someone reminded me that the ancient Israelites wrote the book of Genesis in captivity while exiled in Babylon. Sitting around campfires in a land unfamiliar, they huddled together and weaved a story of how they came to be. Unlike the Babylonian creation story, where humanity issues forth from the guts of violent gods, the Judeo-Christian God, in remarkable contrast, acts as a benevolent presider of a cosmic liturgy, bringing order from chaos with a mellow “Let it be…” (Gen. 1). It’s a God whose feet touch the earth and who walks with humanity hand-in-hand in the “breezy part of the day” (Gen. 2-3). 

How incredible that our ancestors in the faith patched this story together not in a time of peace and prosperity but while fettered and bridled under the watchful eye of oppressive overlords.

The first image we have of God is God as creator. And we are made in God’s image and likeness. My Jesuit brothers and I hope the small offering that is this interactive art retreat is something you can do around the hearth of your own home, to inspire calm and comfort, and engender your own creative playfulness in this time of unusual stress. We hope it prompts reflection on your own story and will serve as a gentle reminder to keep sharing with others that grand, sacred tale of how we came to be, who we are, and whose we are, captivity or quarantine notwithstanding. 

So, we invite you to find some paper, perhaps a pencil or markers, and participate in Drawn into Friendship: An Interactive Art Retreat.

-//-

Photo provided by the author.

Categories: Things Jesuit

Drawn into Friendship: An Interactive Art Retreat

Latest from the Jesuit Post - Wed, 05/27/2020 - 01:00

Join us for an interactive art retreat based on the creation story found in Genesis. Christopher Alt, S.J., and his brother Jesuits will guide you through a series of scripture passages, drawing exercises, and meditations. The retreat, approximately an hour long, can be viewed in one sitting or broken up according to each respective “day of creation.” Whatever you decide, download the “Creation Sketchbook” below, grab some paper, colored and charcoal pencils, and/or crayons and join us as we pray with and reflect on the sacred story of how we came to be, who we are, and whose we are. 

To learn more about this retreat, read Christopher’s reflection, Creating Together: Jesuits Invite You to an Interactive Art Retreat.

English Version:

Creation Sketchbook with Reflection Questions (PDF)

Creation Sketchbook with Reflection Questions (Word)

 

Spanish Version:

El Cuaderno de Bocetos de Creación con Preguntas de Reflexión (PDF)

El Cuaderno de Bocetos de Creación con Preguntas de Reflexión (Word)


Credits:

Christopher Alt, S.J. – Creator and Director
Peter Banda, S.J. – Videographer, Editor, and Designer
Julianna Burrows – Art Consultant
Matthew Zurcher, S.J. – Music Composer
Justin Kelley, S.J. – Music Composer
Mark Blancke, S.J. – Artist
Nathan Krawetzke, S.J. – Artist
Buddy Haryadi, S.J. – Artist
Philip Nahlik, S.J. – Artist
Orlando Portalatin, S.J. – Spanish Video Narrator – Introduction
Fernando Saldivar, S.J. – Spanish Video Narrator – Sacred Scripture
Danilo Mendoza Rugama, S.J. – Spanish Video Narrator – Meditations

Categories: Things Jesuit

⏱️ MoodleNet - Content Sprint

Latest Moodle News - Tue, 05/26/2020 - 07:48
by Doug Belshaw.  

We’re delighted to inform you that MoodleNet v1.0 beta is almost ready! As you may know, we’ve been working on integration with Moodle LMS 3.9.

In preparation, we need to ensure that there is high-quality content available to anyone searching MoodleNet from Moodle LMS.

Therefore, we invite you to apply for a Content Sprint starting NEXT WEEK to add your best openly-licensed resources and links to outstanding content to MoodleNet collections.

Of course, this will mean that you will be one of the first people to have a MoodleNet account on the official Moodle HQ instance! The best content will make its way into featured collections viewable by millions of Moodle users.

Interested? Great! Please fill in this form: https://forms.gle/qgpfUbrcZ6eaUdM28

Waiting for the Spirit Online Retreat Day Five

Ignatian Spirituality - Tue, 05/26/2020 - 03:00

Welcome to Day Five of Waiting for the Spirit! Thank you for joining our online retreat. Feel free to post your reflections in the comments area below each day’s content as we encourage one another in prayer. The Grace I Seek I pray for the grace to recognize the Holy Spirit’s presence in my life. […]

IgnatianSpirituality.com ® is a service of Loyola Press, a Jesuit ministry.

In Always Discerning, Joseph A. Tetlow, SJ, shares how we can implement discernment into not only life’s big decisions but also into the everyday, more mundane choices we constantly have to make.

Click through to read the full article Waiting for the Spirit Online Retreat Day Five, which appeared first on Ignatian Spirituality.

Categories: Things Jesuit

What I Learned About Grace From My Nursing Clinicals

Latest from the Jesuit Post - Tue, 05/26/2020 - 00:00

In the Catholic tradition there is a piece of wisdom handed down by St. Thomas Aquinas: “Grace perfects nature.” In a recent encounter during my nursing clinicals I learned a bit more about this theological insight. Cooperating in a moment of grace with one patient soon returned a hundred-fold just minutes later with another. In the meanwhile, I could feel my being made better. I felt the medicinal urticate of grace as it stung to perfect my own nature and hopefully that of others, too. 

Picture this: 

I had had two days working with a small and chubby, but still short-for-length baby. The room was lowly lit in an extra effort to ward off additional seizures. His was an abuse case that had adult child services and special victim’s unit involved. I bathed him. He held my finger in his weak palmar grasp. Diaper changes and reinserting a nasogastric tube were not amenable moments. For the most part, because this 7-month-old’s suspect parents were peripheral, for these two days of clinical it was just me and the infant. My heart was attached and broken several times over. 

For instance, I was devastated when I found out the blindness caused by hemorrhaging was likely his new permanent reality. This was a completely healthy baby the last time he saw his doctor. It took my breath from me when a nurse explained that the specialists were not sure if he would regain a coordinated swallow; this meant he would be indefinitely on tube feeds. His cheeks were full and his curls cute. 

And then it came time for me to walk away. My two days of clinical that week were over. I walked from his room having said goodbye with just minutes to spare before I needed to leave the floor and tears behind. 

On my way out, I saw a three-year-old patient working with physical therapy. The toddler stood impatiently looking out the pane of glass in the door to his room. I could see the struggle it was for PT to keep him standing on his own feet. The boy was resisting, not wanting to hold his own weight.

With dense sadness in my heart from the infant’s room out of which I had just gone, I slumped on lackluster linoleum cross-legged across the glass from the restlessly dancing exhibitionist. This distracted him. We played patty-cake, his hands leaving fingerprints on the windowpane. He chased my hands and giggled as I moved them for him to catch. In so many ways this silly playing was as much a distraction from my sorrow as it was a diversion that this three-year-old boy might finish his physical therapy. 

In the backscatter I am able to see that the brief gift of joy shared between the three-year-old and me was largely a grace that came to be from the baby I had just accompanied. As much as I would not like to admit it, most days when I walk out of the hospital I am not looking for something to keep me there for a few extra minutes. However, on a day like the one I describe, a day when I have undeniably been a good nurse, the best is brought out of me even more. Having tragically loved a 7-month-old, suddenly, I was all the more able to care for the three-year-old. 

And it did not stop there, either. Grace builds on grace as it perfects nature. The most stinging sensation was on the third day when I was at home and the baby, whom I begged hope’s hand to take, was even now growing my soul’s capacity for true charity. This encounter with grace, a real shot in the arm, continues to nourish my bedside manner. 

We help a patient get better and we are all the better for it. You may call it the economy of grace or effective altruism, if you please. At any rate, one cannot outgive God in the nursing profession. Even in our giving, we get and then can give magis.

//

Photo from Pixabay.com

Categories: Things Jesuit

Waiting for the Spirit Online Retreat Day Four

Ignatian Spirituality - Mon, 05/25/2020 - 03:00

Welcome again to Waiting for the Spirit, as we walk together from Ascension to Pentecost. Feel free to post your reflections in the comments area below each day’s content as we encourage one another in prayer. The Grace I Seek I pray for the grace to recognize the Holy Spirit’s presence in my life. Come, […]

IgnatianSpirituality.com ® is a service of Loyola Press, a Jesuit ministry.

In Always Discerning, Joseph A. Tetlow, SJ, shares how we can implement discernment into not only life’s big decisions but also into the everyday, more mundane choices we constantly have to make.

Click through to read the full article Waiting for the Spirit Online Retreat Day Four, which appeared first on Ignatian Spirituality.

Categories: Things Jesuit

Waiting for the Spirit Online Retreat Day Three

Ignatian Spirituality - Sun, 05/24/2020 - 03:00

Welcome to Day Three of Waiting for the Spirit! Our online retreat is enriched by your presence. Feel free to post your reflections in the comments area below each day’s content as we encourage one another in prayer. The Grace I Seek I pray for the grace to recognize the Holy Spirit’s presence in my […]

IgnatianSpirituality.com ® is a service of Loyola Press, a Jesuit ministry.

In Always Discerning, Joseph A. Tetlow, SJ, shares how we can implement discernment into not only life’s big decisions but also into the everyday, more mundane choices we constantly have to make.

Click through to read the full article Waiting for the Spirit Online Retreat Day Three, which appeared first on Ignatian Spirituality.

Categories: Things Jesuit

The Ascension: Jesus Does Not Leave Us Behind | One-Minute Homily

Latest from the Jesuit Post - Sun, 05/24/2020 - 01:00

When Jesus ascended into heaven and left his disciples, he did not leave them alone. Eric Immel, SJ, reminds us that Christ remains with us too in this One-Minute Homily. Based on the readings for the Ascension of the Lord.

It’s a famous scene in movies – someone rides away in a car or on a train, leaving behind the person who loves them most in the world. Talk about a tug at the ol’ heartstrings.

I’m Eric Immel, and this is my One-Minute Reflection.

Today, most places in the US celebrate the Ascension – that time when Jesus gives his final instruction and says goodbye. It’s the Gospel version of that famous scene – Jesus’ followers and friends stand below, watching the person they love most head off to heaven.

Lucky for us, Jesus doesn’t really leave anyone behind – he promises to remain with us always, and he has prepared us to live on in his love. He has prepared us for the work he calls us to, and offers us his holy spirit that continues to animate the mission of the Church he and the spirit establish.

When that car or train rolls off into the distance – when Jesus is taken up and out of sight, we can’t stand there looking forever. The time is now to carry on.

Categories: Things Jesuit

Waiting for the Spirit Online Retreat Day Two

Ignatian Spirituality - Sat, 05/23/2020 - 03:00

Welcome back to Waiting for the Spirit! This online retreat will lead us from Ascension to Pentecost. Feel free to post your reflections in the comments area below each day’s content as we encourage one another in prayer. The Grace I Seek I pray for the grace to recognize the Holy Spirit’s presence in my […]

IgnatianSpirituality.com ® is a service of Loyola Press, a Jesuit ministry.

In Always Discerning, Joseph A. Tetlow, SJ, shares how we can implement discernment into not only life’s big decisions but also into the everyday, more mundane choices we constantly have to make.

Click through to read the full article Waiting for the Spirit Online Retreat Day Two, which appeared first on Ignatian Spirituality.

Categories: Things Jesuit

Waiting for the Spirit Online Retreat Day One

Ignatian Spirituality - Fri, 05/22/2020 - 03:00

Welcome to Waiting for the Spirit! This online retreat will lead us from Ascension to Pentecost. Feel free to post your reflections in the comments area below each day’s content as we encourage one another in prayer. The Grace I Seek I pray for the grace to recognize the Holy Spirit’s presence in my life. […]

IgnatianSpirituality.com ® is a service of Loyola Press, a Jesuit ministry.

In Always Discerning, Joseph A. Tetlow, SJ, shares how we can implement discernment into not only life’s big decisions but also into the everyday, more mundane choices we constantly have to make.

Click through to read the full article Waiting for the Spirit Online Retreat Day One, which appeared first on Ignatian Spirituality.

Categories: Things Jesuit

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