Things Jesuit

Putting a Stop to Food Waste

Ignatian Spirituality - Wed, 07/21/2021 - 05:30

By Fiona Basile

About 18 months ago I watched a documentary by American chef and author Anthony Bourdain, Wasted! The Story of Food Waste, which completely transformed the way I saw and disposed of food. I was so moved and disturbed by the information provided in the documentary—about how much food we waste and throw away into landfills, […]

IgnatianSpirituality.com ® is a service of Loyola Press, a Jesuit ministry.

Whether reading as a novice or an expert in Ignatian spirituality, The Pilgrim’s Story by Brendan Comerford, SJ, satisfies with fresh perspective and deep insight into the life of St. Ignatius Loyola.

Click through to read the full article Putting a Stop to Food Waste, which appeared first on Ignatian Spirituality.

Categories: Things Jesuit

Cannonball Moment at a Funeral

Ignatian Spirituality - Mon, 07/19/2021 - 05:30

By dotMagis Editor

Patrick Saint-Jean, SJ, at Creighton University, introduces his cannonball moment with the words, “A sad experience made me the happiest guy in the whole world.” The funeral of his godfather brought him to a Catholic church for the first time, where something in the homily gave him consolation. Watch the video of Saint-Jean explaining his […]

IgnatianSpirituality.com ® is a service of Loyola Press, a Jesuit ministry.

God Is Right in Front of You, as Brian Grogan, SJ, explains in his field guide to Ignatian spirituality.

Click through to read the full article Cannonball Moment at a Funeral, which appeared first on Ignatian Spirituality.

Categories: Things Jesuit

California Is in a Drought. Taking Shorter Showers Is Not the Solution.

Latest from the Jesuit Post - Mon, 07/19/2021 - 01:00

California is in the midst of a drought. Again. One cannot help but feel a sense of deja vu as well-meaning folks take fewer or shorter showers and decline water at restaurants. Some may even let their lawns dry out. Though well-meaning and good in themselves, these actions are akin to fussing over a dripping kitchen faucet while your garden hose is open full blast all day. The real problem is not showers, but the water used in animal agriculture. 

Driving along Interstate 5 in California’s Central Valley, one can see numerous placards proclaiming that growing food is not a waste of water. This is only partially true. Growing grass and corn to feed animals for meat is a waste when the land and water could have been used to grow crops for direct human consumption. 

In the battle for the ever-diminishing supply of water in California, we need to examine which sectors use the largest amount of this precious commodity. The agriculture industry uses about four times the amount of water that urban populations consume. According to a publication by the University of California Davis, 29% of California’s water is used to irrigate pastures or grow alfalfa for farm animal consumption. Another 7% is used to grow corn, which is fed to animals. This means that more than a third of the water used in agriculture, or about 30% of all human consumption of water in California is used for animal agriculture. 

An article in Bloomberg puts these numbers into perspective: “put it all together and growing things to feed cattle use more than 10 million acre-feet of water in California in an average year… all the people in California used 8.6 million acre-feet a year.” The bottom line is that animal agriculture puts a tremendous strain on the water resources of the drought-stricken state of California.

Even when there is sufficient water in our rivers to irrigate farmland, we need to use as little as we can. Rivers need to be allowed to reach the ocean because freshwater flowing into estuaries is an essential part of estuarine habitats that support diverse wildlife. Excessive withdrawal of water from rivers such as the Colorado River has led to rivers drying up before they reach the ocean, destroying habitats along the rivers and estuaries in the process. For example, certain fish species such as salmon need clean and cool water in rivers for reproduction. As large quantities of water from rivers are diverted for irrigation of crops, salmon populations have plummeted, leading to the use of artificial methods to ensure their survival.

Animal agriculture serving our meat-heavy diets are also causing issues beyond the drought-stricken California. Water pollution through runoff from livestock waste and fertilizers used to grow crops for livestock cause toxic algae blooms in the Great Lakes. The dead zones in the Gulf of Mexico and other coastal areas and the pollution of rivers can be attributed to farming operations that produce meat and dairy.

Farming operations of plant-based food also cause water pollution, but on a much smaller scale. First, there is no sewage from plants that contaminates water bodies. As a result, plant agriculture is much cleaner than animal agriculture by default. Secondly, fewer crops need to be grown for a plant-based diet. According to a study by an ecologist at Cornell University, if all the grain currently fed to livestock in the United States were consumed directly by people, we could feed nearly 800 million people, more than twice the total population of the US. In other words, we could half our agricultural land and water footprint by shifting to a plant-based diet.

Hypothetically, if we shifted to a plant-based diet, the land and water used to grow crops for animals could be returned to nature, restoring endangered grasslands and replenishing dry river beds. Imagine if the grasslands of the Great Plains were restored to their former glory, teaming with wildlife and watered by pristine streams and rivers. Imagine the Colorado river reaching the Gulf of California watering a verdant delta in a desert. According to an article in the Los Angeles Times, “In 1922, the great naturalist Aldo Leopold canoeed through the (Colorado River) delta, which he described as “a milk and honey wilderness” and a land of “a hundred green lagoons.” It was home back then to deer, quail, raccoon, bobcat, jaguar and vast flocks of waterfowl, and its 2-million-acre expanse was a crucial stopover on the Pacific flyway, providing respite and feeding grounds for millions of migratory birds as they journeyed across the western Americas.” Can we imagine today’s desiccated delta of the Colorado River as a land of “a hundred green lagoons” again?

These Edenesque portraits can come to fruition if we reduce the amount of land and water we use to support our meat-based diets.

The instinct to do what we can to alleviate this drought crisis is noble. However, our instinct to do good should be informed by an awareness of the larger problem at hand. In addition to being a burden on water resources, animal agriculture harms the natural environment by contributing to carbon emissions, the ravaging of forests and grasslands, and water pollution. 

As Pope Francis writes in Laudato Si: “Together with our obligation to use the earth’s goods responsibly, we are called to recognize that other living beings have a value of their own in God’s eyes: “by their mere existence they bless him and give him glory”,[41] and indeed, “the Lord rejoices in all his works” (Ps 104:31).” We must not destroy God’s works, the works in which God rejoices.

We will need to act at a personal level and at a systemic level to align our lifestyle with the ecological vision of the Catholic faith. Reducing or ceasing our consumption of animal based foods while concurrently encouraging our elected leaders to pass laws that protect our water resources is the way forward. Lack of action at an individual level while espousing ecofriendly views reeks of hypocrisy, and lack of action at a systemic level blocks real change.

Categories: Things Jesuit

Recognizing the Voice of the Shepherd | One-Minute Homily

Latest from the Jesuit Post - Sun, 07/18/2021 - 01:00

How do we recognize the voice of the shepherd? Sullivan McCormick, SJ, reflects on discerning the different voices that we might hear in our head in this week’s One-Minute Homily. Based on the readings for Sunday, July 18, 2021.

How do we know the voice of the shepherd? 

Hi, I’m Br. Sullivan McCormick and this is my One-Minute Reflection. 

Amidst the countless voices in our head, which voices are of God? Today’s Gospel verse after the Alleluia encapsulates a theme in the readings: the guidance of the shepherd. The verse says, “My sheep hear my voice, says the Lord; I know them, and they follow me.” 

There’s another voice that we might hear from time to time and St. Ignatius calls that the evil spirit. I experienced this voice when I was on an 8-day retreat before I entered the Jesuits. While praying I heard, “you have prayed well throughout this retreat, but you could never maintain that amount of prayer every day as a Jesuit.” This highlights the primary characteristic of the evil spirit’s voice: discouragement. On the contrary, St. Ignatius tells us that when we are moving from good to better in the spiritual life, the good spirit gives us strength and courage. In this context, we know the voice of the shepherd when we experience the voice of encouragement. 

Categories: Things Jesuit

Cannonball at Loyola Chapel of the Conversion

Ignatian Spirituality - Fri, 07/16/2021 - 05:30

By Jim Manney

Editor’s note: Throughout July, we’re celebrating 31 Days with St. Ignatius, a month-long celebration of Ignatian spirituality. In addition to the calendar of Ignatian articles found here, posts on dotMagis this month will explore cannonball moments—moments that changed the course of a life, just as getting hit by a cannonball changed the course of St. Ignatius Loyola’s life. The inspiration […]

IgnatianSpirituality.com ® is a service of Loyola Press, a Jesuit ministry.

God Is Right in Front of You, as Brian Grogan, SJ, explains in his field guide to Ignatian spirituality.

Click through to read the full article Cannonball at Loyola Chapel of the Conversion, which appeared first on Ignatian Spirituality.

Categories: Things Jesuit

Italy and Argentina Conquer Continental Soccer

Latest from the Jesuit Post - Fri, 07/16/2021 - 02:33

Both international soccer championship matches played last weekend were neck and neck. Both saw the defeat of the host nation. Brazil lost the Copa America to Argentina on July 10th in the famed Maracana stadium in Rio de Janeiro, while England lost the European Championship a day later to Italy at Wembley Stadium. Both sparked the joy of a nation and of the footballing world respectively. 

The importance of Italy’s win struck home for me as I listened to John Allen’s “Last Week in the Church,” which streams from a studio in Rome where he lives. John reminded listeners that Italy was the first country outside of China to get hit by the coronavirus. Since last year, over 125 thousand Italians have died of COVID-19. That tragedy combined with the fact that Italy had not won the European finals in over 60 years meant that Sunday’s win at Wembley warranted national celebrations. “This run in the European tournament combined a defining Italian passion with a nation badly, badly, in need of an infusion of happiness, of joy, of relief.” That almost desperate passion was even palpable outside of Italy, especially in the New York pub where I watched the Euro Cup final alongside fans of both England and Italy—the Italians were louder. 

The finals even got Pope Francis, famous soccer fan and an Argentinian born of Italian immigrants, reflecting on the importance of sport. After Argentina and Italy’s victory, Pope Francis said the value of athletic competition is learning to accept whatever the outcome, even defeat. “Only in this way, faced with the difficulties of life,” Pope Francis said, “can one always put everything into the game, struggling without giving up, with hope and confidence.” 

While I value the Holy Father’s wise words, I must admit that I was not completely indifferent to the outcome of the Copa America. Anyone who knows me well can tell you I’m a slightly obsessed fan of Lionel Messi, the captain of La Albiceleste (Argentina’s team nickname). And I joined millions of other Messi aficionados from around the globe who were willing a victory for the away team. It wasn’t only Messi fans who wanted to see this win, global soccer wanted this (just check Twitter).

The reason for this is that, even though Messi is arguably the best soccer player who has ever played the game, he’s not won any awards with the senior national team of Argentina. He’s conquered Europe four times with FC Barcelona and has won La Liga 10 times, as well as taking six Copas del Rey. Messi and Argentina have even won an Olympic title, but that is played with a squad predominantly consisting of U-23 players. It’s not considered the senior squad. There was only one kind of trophy missing from his case. 

And it’s not like Messi hasn’t gotten close. Four times he’s appeared in a major final with his national side: once at the 2014 World Cup against Germany, and three more at the Copa America (2007, 2015, and 2016). In response to the 2016 loss, Messi even announced an early retirement from national soccer–he just couldn’t bear the possibility of  seeing his hopes dashed again. Lucky for us Messi fanatics, and for the soccer world in general, Messi renounced those retirement plans less than a year later. True hope isn’t vanquished so easily.

On Saturday, July 10th, Lionel Messi and Argentina saw a dream deferred become a dream come true. Argentina’s Angel de Maria scored a first-half goal, cushioning a driven-through ball out of the air before lobbing it over the keeper’s head, and that was the game winner. After five minutes of second half stoppage time, the ref blew the final whistle to end the match. Messi collapsed to his knees. The relief of getting the weight of a nation off his shoulders was tangible. His whole team knew what victory meant for their captain. They rushed the kneeling Messi and piled that weight back on. 

I imagine it felt lighter this time around.

Categories: Things Jesuit

A Transformative T-Shirt Slogan

Ignatian Spirituality - Wed, 07/14/2021 - 05:30

By dotMagis Editor

Theresa Wang, a campus minister from Taiwan, was thinking about leaving her school when a t-shirt slogan caught her attention. Shortly after, she went on a retreat where she experienced the love of God. Watch the video of Wang explaining her cannonball moment below. The English translation is available when the closed captioning is on. […]

IgnatianSpirituality.com ® is a service of Loyola Press, a Jesuit ministry.

God Is Right in Front of You, as Brian Grogan, SJ, explains in his field guide to Ignatian spirituality.

Click through to read the full article A Transformative T-Shirt Slogan, which appeared first on Ignatian Spirituality.

Categories: Things Jesuit

The Holy Squad of Women Who Nurtured My Faith

Latest from the Jesuit Post - Wed, 07/14/2021 - 01:00

“Vee ah closing ze doors now,” instructed Hilde, a terrifying, 5 foot tall German octogenarian. She had no patience for my Dad who was waiting for me to leave the church. “Vee ah closing ze doors now,” she repeated, as she bolted the massive doors of the Basilica—the church in which I received all my sacraments. As on every night at 8:45PM sharp, she shooed out lingering parishioners, checked for any street people hiding in the confessional, and closed the doors.

Hilde was a part of a gang of old folks who were at the Basilica whenever its doors were open. She, Shirley, and a few other folks made a holy hour every night prior to closing the church, faithfully reading their binder of devotions. With monotone voice, they rattled through the rosary and other devotions, always finishing with a Bing Crosby crooner, “Good Night Sweet Jesus.” 

Another member of the squad was a Brooklynite named Theresa. She and another lady, Sylvia, lived in the Senior Apartments next to the church and would spend the entire day in church. Sylvia gave me a golden dollar every Christmas and random Catholic tchotchkes at other times. Theresa was always wheezing out a rosary in some state between wakefulness and sleep, but she would always reach out her arms when she saw me. She covered me in her red lipstick, told me that I was going to be a priest someday, and called me her “St. Martin de Porres” (There aren’t a lot of options for saint nicknames for little black boys).

Every Monday, a red haired Portuguese woman and her husband were in charge of closing the church. Her name was Fernanda, but we called her Fern and she was fierce. She knew the 15 prayers of St. Brigid by heart and would say them every day from worn photocopied pages old enough to have been copied by Brigid herself. 

In my early teens, I went through a phase of not wanting to wear a coat. Fern quietly assumed it was because I could not afford one. One evening, she gestured to me from her usual spot in the back of the Adoration Chapel and pushed a new coat into my hands. She did not have a lot, but with the little she had, she made sure that I was warm. I wore a coat from that day forward.

One beautiful soul, Marjorie, was the regent of the Catholic Daughters. She led it through the integration of the church in the 1960s and when I became Catholic in 2000 she was still in charge. She was Black and attended the Black parish on the South side until the bishop closed it in an effort to hasten desegregation. Neither those ousted from their churches, nor the white folks forced to accommodate them were very happy with the arrangement. Some white members were downright nasty to the new Black parishioners. Nevertheless, grace-filled women like Marjorie stuck it out.

Marjorie was always organizing events—her favorite was setting up a stand to give out free water during our hot summer festival in town. A former lounge singer, she would always call out to me “there’s my baby” in a raspy voice. She was a chain smoker and when she arrived at church for daily mass—always late—she would rush out of her Cadillac amid billows of smoke, smiling and beaming with light. She was never in too much of a hurry to greet everybody. In fact, she was the only greeter that our church had for many years and she was the only one we needed.

Some were mystics. Joan, who suffered terribly from cancer, was always raspily praying. Nevertheless, whenever our priest opened the prayers of the faithful up for everyone, she would—without fail—begin a long prayer with “Father I give you praise…” No one was ever quite sure when to say “Lord hear our Prayer,” but everyone knew that God had heard Joan. 

There were many saints, but the holiest was Jane. She was quiet and shy with big eyes amplified by big glasses. She was one of the organizers of adoration at the parish and whenever a person could not make their time, or a time slot could not be filled, Jane was there. Her pride and joy was her adult daughter who was developmentally challenged and who lived with her and her husband. 

The last time I saw Jane, she recounted how when I was converting and had just learned how to say the rosary, I would always come to adoration when she was there and ask her if she wanted to pray with me. As we laughed, she filled in the rest of the story—it so happened that she was always right about to leave when I would ask her. She had things to do. She had a family to feed. She had a daughter with needs. She had already spent hours in the church that day. Nevertheless, she smiled, many years later, as I stood before her as an embarrassed adult, she beamed the same sincere smile: “I was blessed to have done it” she whispered. 

Hilde, Sylvia, Theresa, Fern, Marjorie and Joan all passed away over the years along with others whose stories are too many to tell. Every time I came home to church during college or afterwards, it seemed a little emptier and a little less like home. Last year, Jane died of an aneurism. Her absence was the hardest. I came back to church for the first time after she passed away, our priests having also retired, and it was not the same—it was cold. 

During the Lamb of God, I looked around for the kind, wrinkled smiles that had welcomed me into the church before I was even Catholic. I tried to meet the wise eyes that were always watching from the same pew, every day. They were gone. It was eerie and unsettling. Church just didn’t feel like church without these pillars.

Some days later, I dropped into the church. Looking around, I stopped and sat in Fern’s spot, hidden in the back of the adoration chapel. I imagined being with Jesus and all of his friends who were women.  I have always been comforted by Jesus’ squad of holy women. Disciples, friends, coworkers, laborers, sages, Jesus surrounded himself with faithful women—strong Marthas, mystic Marys and Annas who spent their entire waking life awaiting him patiently in the temple. 

I began to imagine each of them, and as I looked around, the faces of his friends were quite familiar. Mary of Bethany kissed the pages of her worn out Passion, and Martha was smiling from a cloud of smoke. Anna mumbled God’s praise through heavily lipsticked lips. Last, I imagined Mary—her big eyes amplified by her big glasses smiling sheepishly, as she sat beside me. It only seemed right to continue my childhood tradition: I asked her to pray the rosary with me. 

This prayer reminded me of one of the most comforting ideas Catholics have in the Eucharist. Wherever the Eucharist is, however it is celebrated, received and adored, there too, are all of the saints. Our loved ones, and not so loved ones, the ones we’d expect, and the ones that we never would have imagined, join us in the love which they showered us with on Earth. Our bond with them, with all the saints, is so real and strong that even Hilde in her five foot heavenly glory cannot close ze doors between us.

Categories: Things Jesuit

The Moment I Became a Mom

Ignatian Spirituality - Mon, 07/12/2021 - 05:30

By Becky Eldredge

Editor’s note: Throughout July, we’re celebrating 31 Days with St. Ignatius, a month-long celebration of Ignatian spirituality. In addition to the calendar of Ignatian articles found here, posts on dotMagis this month will explore cannonball moments—moments that changed the course of a life, just as getting hit by a cannonball changed the course of St. Ignatius Loyola’s life. The inspiration […]

IgnatianSpirituality.com ® is a service of Loyola Press, a Jesuit ministry.

In a time when the Church suffered violent division and strife, one man peacefully modeled compassion and dialogue. Read Peter Faber by Jon M. Sweeney.

Click through to read the full article The Moment I Became a Mom, which appeared first on Ignatian Spirituality.

Categories: Things Jesuit

The Kingdom of God is About Freedom | One-Minute Homily

Latest from the Jesuit Post - Sun, 07/11/2021 - 01:00

What will we leave behind to follow Jesus? Patrick Saint-Jean, SJ, reflects on the call of Jesus in today’s gospel. Based on the readings for Sunday, July 11, 2021. 

What are you willing to leave behind now to come with Jesus?

Hi, my name is Patrick Saint-Jean. This is my one-minute reflection.  

I used to have a cozy blanket when I was a kid. I would never leave it behind for anything in the world. When it was time to go on vacation with my parents, they would say, “Your only Job is: Wake up on time. Take nothing with you. Come with us.” When I remember that I am going to leave my blanket behind, I used to resist going, yet vacation was always fun and restful. 

Today, Mark invites us to engage in a similar story where Jesus calls the twelve disciples: Take nothing for the journey. Just come. 

This is Freedom. 

Just like me with my parents, most of them did not refuse to come when they remembered what they were going to leave behind. Yet in return, Jesus surprised them by sharing his gift of preaching, healing and teaching.

Categories: Things Jesuit

When the Scientist Encountered Deer

Ignatian Spirituality - Fri, 07/09/2021 - 05:30

By dotMagis Editor

Astrophysicist Paolo Beltrame, SJ, from Italy, was in South Dakota one Christmas when he saw deer. In that encounter, he experienced God not only as “a higher intelligence that regulates the universe” but also as “a personal presence that cares for humans, deer, nature, and all that exists.” Watch the video of Beltrame explaining his […]

IgnatianSpirituality.com ® is a service of Loyola Press, a Jesuit ministry.

In a time when the Church suffered violent division and strife, one man peacefully modeled compassion and dialogue. Read Peter Faber by Jon M. Sweeney.

Click through to read the full article When the Scientist Encountered Deer, which appeared first on Ignatian Spirituality.

Categories: Things Jesuit

My Bravest Prayer

Ignatian Spirituality - Wed, 07/07/2021 - 05:30

By Jean Heaton

Editor’s note: Throughout July, we’re celebrating 31 Days with St. Ignatius, a month-long celebration of Ignatian spirituality. In addition to the calendar of Ignatian articles found here, posts on dotMagis this month will explore cannonball moments—moments that changed the course of a life, just as getting hit by a cannonball changed the course of St. Ignatius Loyola’s life. The inspiration […]

IgnatianSpirituality.com ® is a service of Loyola Press, a Jesuit ministry.

In a time when the Church suffered violent division and strife, one man peacefully modeled compassion and dialogue. Read Peter Faber by Jon M. Sweeney.

Click through to read the full article My Bravest Prayer, which appeared first on Ignatian Spirituality.

Categories: Things Jesuit

Touring a Funeral Home Helped Me Understand St. Ignatius Better

Latest from the Jesuit Post - Wed, 07/07/2021 - 01:00

Recently, I had a chance to accompany my friend to a funeral home to prepare for his father’s funeral. Knowing that both of us are religious, the manager offered to show us behind-the-scenes of the funeral home. As I was on the tour, never in my life did I feel so close to death. It was not my own death I felt close to, but the very presence of death itself. I was struck by the simplicity of life and death, the fragility of human life, and the transformative power of death in its utmost emptiness. 

Five hundred years ago, on May 20, 1521, at the battle of Pamplona, a cannonball shattered the leg of a Spanish soldier. The Spanish soldier was Iñigo López de Oñaz y Loyola, who later became the founder of the Society of Jesus and left a legacy that still influences the world until this day. 

Iñigo was destined to be an honorable knight who would fight to the death for his queen, at least that’s what he thought. When he was shot by a cannonball, together with his leg, his image and ideologies were also shattered. On the convalescent bed, a few times he came close to death, but he survived, and his survival made him question his past life and ponder the meaning of life. Being so close to death he could look back at life with a meaningful gaze. That theme of finding life in death continued throughout his life. 

The covid-19 pandemic left many of us with similar encounters as Ignatius. In my funeral home tour, the guide told me that during the pandemic, the place held around 90 bodies at once. Death became so present among the community, especially families who lost their loved ones during the pandemic. I remember my friend telling me that his family still has not recovered from the death of his grandparent, as it was too sudden. Like a cannonball, death comes and takes away the love of our life, turning over our peaceful life into chaos, and leaving us with a sense of emptiness. 

During the peak of the pandemic in NYC, I remember hearing the ambulance siren every hour. Every time I heard it, not knowing what would happen, I simply said a prayer, “May Your Will be done.” I imagined that, somewhere, people were bargaining with God, asking to spare the life of their loved ones. Just like Iñigo asked to have his leg rebroken and reset thus becoming limped for the rest of his life, our brokenness cannot return to what it was. No matter how much I try to fix things, things will never be the same, and I will carry my brokenness for the rest of my life.

After Jesus of Nazareth died on the cross and resurrected three days later, he still carried the wounds of the nails, and despite the hope of his followers, Jesus did not return things to how they were. Death is the end of a journey, but also the beginning of a new one. Like a river, life continues to flow, so I can either try to stay stagnant and fight against the stream of life or let myself be carried to a new tributary. 

After his leg was healed, Iñigo, the flamboyant knight, took on a new journey and a new identity: Ignatius the pilgrim. With his limp leg, the pilgrim began his pilgrimage not knowing his destination but knowing that he was not alone on the journey.

Seeing the dead bodies in front of me, I imagine that each of them was accompanied by an angel of death, who gently guides them to a new journey. I remember the words of St. Francis of Assisi who praised God for Sister Death, the one who embraces all beings. 

Categories: Things Jesuit

Cannonball D

Ignatian Spirituality - Mon, 07/05/2021 - 05:30

By Gretchen Crowder

Editor’s note: Throughout July, we’re celebrating 31 Days with St. Ignatius, a month-long celebration of Ignatian spirituality. In addition to the calendar of Ignatian articles found here, posts on dotMagis this month will explore cannonball moments—moments that changed the course of a life, just as getting hit by a cannonball changed the course of St. Ignatius Loyola’s life. The inspiration […]

IgnatianSpirituality.com ® is a service of Loyola Press, a Jesuit ministry.

In The Ignatian Guide to Forgiveness, Marina Berzins McCoy delves into the principles of Ignatian spirituality and uses gentle honesty to lay out 10 steps toward forgiveness.

Click through to read the full article Cannonball D, which appeared first on Ignatian Spirituality.

Categories: Things Jesuit

The Pain of Change | One-Minute Homily

Latest from the Jesuit Post - Sun, 07/04/2021 - 01:00

Nobody likes change. That’s often why people rejected the message of Jesus and the prophets. Fr Eric Sundrup, SJ reflects on the pain of change and the message of Jesus. Based on the readings for Sunday, July 4, 2021.

Nobody likes change.

Hi I’m Fr. Eric Sundrup and this is my one-minute homily.

Let’s face it, nobody actually LOVES change. Change is painful. And the people call us out and force us to face the pain of change…They’re called prophets… and they’re often annoying.

In today’s Gospel, Jesus pulls out a popular old adage. “A prophet is not without honor except in his native place.”

Jesus has just been performing jaw dropping, eye-popping miracles in the nearby regions, and he gets back to his home turf and people are like… “Ummm no, we remember him from grade school, We’re not interested.”

It’s easier to tear into his past and background than accept that something new is brewing that might upset previously established and comfortable categories.

Why do we do that? 

I’d wager we are avoiding the pain of change. The challenge that will make us grow. Well, no pain, no gain. Let’s take some time today and ask God to help us face the music. Where do we need to hear the words of a prophet?

Categories: Things Jesuit

Cannonball Moment: A Friend’s Death

Ignatian Spirituality - Fri, 07/02/2021 - 05:30

By Shemaiah Gonzalez

Editor’s note: Throughout July, we’re celebrating 31 Days with St. Ignatius, a month-long celebration of Ignatian spirituality. In addition to the calendar of Ignatian articles found here, posts on dotMagis this month will explore cannonball moments—moments that changed the course of a life, just as getting hit by a cannonball changed the course of St. […]

IgnatianSpirituality.com ® is a service of Loyola Press, a Jesuit ministry.

In The Ignatian Guide to Forgiveness, Marina Berzins McCoy delves into the principles of Ignatian spirituality and uses gentle honesty to lay out 10 steps toward forgiveness.

Click through to read the full article Cannonball Moment: A Friend’s Death, which appeared first on Ignatian Spirituality.

Categories: Things Jesuit

The Wound – Song

Ignatian Spirituality - Wed, 06/30/2021 - 05:30

By dotMagis Editor

The Ignatian Year has a theme song, “La Herida,” or, “The Wound.” Composed by Cristóbal Fones, SJ, with lyrics by José María Rodríguez Olaizola, SJ, the song was translated into English and French by Phillip Hurley, SJ, and Pierre Bélanger, SJ, respectively. In English, the refrain is, “At the end of our days we will […]

IgnatianSpirituality.com ® is a service of Loyola Press, a Jesuit ministry.

In The Ignatian Guide to Forgiveness, Marina Berzins McCoy delves into the principles of Ignatian spirituality and uses gentle honesty to lay out 10 steps toward forgiveness.

Click through to read the full article The Wound – Song, which appeared first on Ignatian Spirituality.

Categories: Things Jesuit

Shattered Tomato and Dripping Rain

Ignatian Spirituality - Mon, 06/28/2021 - 05:30

By Rebecca Ruiz

We had been having torrential downpours all day. I usually love the sound of the rain, but there is one sound that I don’t like: Drip. Drip. Drip. It’s really not a sound I like to hear coming from inside the roof of my car. As the rain intensified, the drip quickly became a steady […]

IgnatianSpirituality.com ® is a service of Loyola Press, a Jesuit ministry.

Helping Families Recover from Addiction: Coping, Growing, and Healing through 12-Step Practices and Ignatian Spirituality retells Jean Heaton’s journey “working the steps” as a family member of people with addictions.

Click through to read the full article Shattered Tomato and Dripping Rain, which appeared first on Ignatian Spirituality.

Categories: Things Jesuit

Life and Death Through Christ | One-Minute Homily

Latest from the Jesuit Post - Sun, 06/27/2021 - 01:41

Today’s readings remind us that God does not create death, but works to defeat death through the Resurrection.

“The glory of God is the living human being.” – St. Irenaeus of Lyon.

Hi, I’m Doug Jones, and this is my One Minute Reflection. 

Our first reading today reminds us that God did not create death. God created life, in all its glory and goodness. 

It is we, rather, who at times reject that life through our sinfulness and selfishness. In choosing hate over love, revenge over mercy, the quest for pleasure over the quest for peace, fighting over reconciliation, we choose death over life. 

But God did not abandon us to our mistakes. He sent us Jesus, not only as a model for how to live, but as the conqueror of death itself through the wood of the Cross. 

As we remember Jesus’ Resurrection today, as we do every Sunday, we remember our call as Christians to imitate the humility of Jesus. As St. Paul reminds us, he became poor so that we might become rich, rich in the life that God has created for us.

Categories: Things Jesuit

Nearness

Ignatian Spirituality - Fri, 06/25/2021 - 05:30

By dotMagis Editor

The Mystery of the Incarnation overcomes the problem of distance. Without the Incarnation, without the Word of God becoming fully human, God will never be anything more than an abstraction. You cannot get close to an abstraction. You cannot experience intimacy with an idea. But through the Incarnation, we can fall in love with and […]

IgnatianSpirituality.com ® is a service of Loyola Press, a Jesuit ministry.

Helping Families Recover from Addiction: Coping, Growing, and Healing through 12-Step Practices and Ignatian Spirituality retells Jean Heaton’s journey “working the steps” as a family member of people with addictions.

Click through to read the full article Nearness, which appeared first on Ignatian Spirituality.

Categories: Things Jesuit

Pages